This unit plan is designed to not only educate students about individuals that have made a difference in the world, but also to help each student find the voice that will help continue social change in America. They will analyze speeches and a poem to learn the language of power through discourse, culminating in a speech presented by each student in the class about a social issue of the current day.


Literature for the Unit

“I Have a Dream”: Martin Luther King, Jr.

“I am the First Accused,” 1964 speech: Nelson Mandela

“Invictus”: William Ernest Henley


external image Martin-Luther-King-Jr-9365086-2-402.jpgexternal image Nelson-Mandela-9397017-1-402.jpg
external image William+Ernest+Henley.jpg





Unit Plan

Downloading this unit plan is the most effective way to work with this unit, as the unit plan document holds more links and information that is not present within this wiki. Below is a basic timeline and five lesson plans that exhibit this unit's compliance with Georgia's Common Core Performance Standards.

Week One: Seeing the Dream

Day One: Martin Luther King Speech and Discussion
Day Two: Discussion of Nelson Mandela (Note-Taking Guide)
Day Three: Continued Discussion of Mandela and Presentation of Audio of Nelson Mandela
Day Four: Discuss of Mandela’s strengths and skills as a writer/speaker (Look for these things on day 5)
Day Five: Starting the text work with Nelson Mandela (Read portion aloud) Graphic Organizer to aid text work
Week Two: Building the Dream

Day Six: Continued discussion of Mandela Text
Day Seven: Finish review of text. Review for quiz
Day Eight: Quiz over Mandela Text (No more than 20 min)

Introduction to Invictus
Day Nine: Discussion of Invictus (Recommend use of guided notes)
Day Ten: Class Debate-Speech vs. Poem
Week Three: Speaking the Dream

Day Eleven: Choose topic for personal speech, begin brainstorming and writing
Day Twelve: Write Speech, Three Paragraphs Min. (Speech for Homework)
Day Thirteen: Peer Review
Day Fourteen: Presentations (Peer Reports)
Day Fifteen: Presentations (Peer Reports)